Most Bizarre Town Names in the U.S.

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Not every city in the U.S. has a hip name like Miami or Phoenix. Some places tend to stand out in terms of originality. Here are some of the most bizarre town names across the United States.

Boring, Oregon

The people of Boring, Oregon don’t seem fairly concerned about tourism. How many people are going to want to visit a town named Boring? Boring is a small town east of Portland and there’s not much to do there. The most common pastime for tourists is driving around looking for street signs with the name of the town for a funny photo op. Since Boring is a charming small town, perhaps the name is actually a brilliant effort to keep people away and maintain the quaintness. The world may never know.

Chugwater, Wyoming

Wyoming state sign standing tall in a rural, desolate region of the state
Credit: Everett Media/ Shutterstock

Nestled in the mountains of Wyoming is a tiny town with a peculiar name — Chugwater. The name is said to have originated from Native Americans who used to inhabit the land. Instead of hunting bison with bows and spears, a creative Mandan tribal leader decided that it was easier to simply drive the bison off a cliff and pick them out of the river below. “Chug” was the word they used to describe the sound of the bison hitting the water. Although its origin sounds pretty morbid, the name was adopted by the white settlers who arrived later. The area was initially called Chug Springs, while the creek was named Chugwater Creek. The town became officially known as Chugwater after the creek.

Mosquitoville, Vermont

Vermont state sign on the border with green field in the background
Credit: Katherine Welles/ Shutterstock

Another town that isn’t trying hard to attract visitors is Mosquitoville, Vermont. Mosquitoville is located in the eastern part of the state near New Hampshire. The town is so small that there’s no census information for it. It’s located in the dense Vermont wilderness and although it’s quite pretty, it’s likely that there is a surplus of mosquitos there.

Waterproof, Louisiana

If any state needs a town named Waterproof, it’s Louisiana. This small town is located right on the Mississippi River. Apart from its bizarre name, there’s not much that goes on in Waterproof. There are only about 600 residents, a post office, and a couple of churches.

Ding Dong, Texas

Texas state sign on the highway with grasses in the background
Credit: miroslav_1/ iStock

In the 1930s, a couple named Bert and Zulis Bell founded a small town in central Texas. The Bells ran a country store and hired a painter to create a sign for the front of it. A local jokester, Fred Foster, told the painter he should play a little trick on the Bells. Foster suggested painting two bells on the sign with Bert and Zulis’ names on them with the caption “Ding Dong” underneath. The painter took their advice and after the sign was debuted, the town was forever known as Ding Dong.

Satan’s Kingdom, Massachusetts

Despite its terrifying name, there’s not really anything sinister about Satan’s Kingdom, Massachusetts. The town supposedly earned its name after a massive forest fire. In 1937, a particularly “fire and brimstone” pastor named Herbert C. Parsons wrote a book that described the fires of hell burning across the Connecticut River in Satan’s Kingdom. The name stuck and is still used to describe the western part of the town of Northfield, Massachusetts.

Booger Hole, West Virginia

West Virginia state sign next to a curving road
Credit: Joseph Sohm/ Shutterstock

In the early 1900s, the town of Booger Hole in central West Virginia endured a series of murders and disappearances. The murderer was never discovered, but eight people were killed over the span of a few years. “Booger” was a popular name to describe the bogeyman. Since the violence was so bad, the town became known as Booger Hole.

Toad Suck, Arkansas

There’s not much going on in Toad Suck, Arkansas. It’s a just a tiny settlement on the edge of the Arkansas River. There used to be a tavern on the western side of the river that was popular with the locals. If you were looking for someone and asked a local where they might be, they’d most likely respond with, “Go down to the tavern. He’ll be sucking on a bottle so much he’s swollen up like a toad.” It didn’t take long before the settlement became known as “Toad Suck.” Unfortunately, the name stuck.

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